Book Review: Creative Block

Book Review: Creative Block

If you follow Danielle Krysa’s website, The Jealous Curator, you likely know (and maybe have already grabbed a copy!) of her first book, Creative Block. When I first heard she was publishing Creative Block, I knew I had to get a copy immediately. The book is chock-full of interviews with amazing artists, each leaving the reader with an assignment of how to get “unstuck” from a creative block.

“I have frequent creative blocks, like I think every artist does, but I learn a lot about what I want in my art from my unsuccessful work.” -Amanda Smith

I’ll admit I was in one giant creative block before I heard of this book. I was comfortable in my creative routine, not allowing myself time to experiment and play with my art anymore. Reading that other well-known artists experience the same struggles as me was inspiring. Even more inspiring was to read how each of these artists came out of a creative block. To have 50 different ways to get “unstuck” from 50 different artists in one compact book is enough to open the floodgates for the largest creative block.

Going through some of the activities in the book made me feel like a student again. It was both frightening and exhilarating to have no idea what I was painting or drawing or creating. It was freeing to create a piece that I absolutely hated and then cut it into pieces to make something else. It was refreshing to create a piece for no reason at all other than because I felt like creating at that very moment in time.

Book Review: Creative Block

“You have to set up the narrow parameters that you work in, and then within those, give yourself just enough room to be free and play.” -Trey Speegle

Overall, Creative Block gave me a sense of contentment. Gaining little bits of knowledge from each artist, and being able to take a small snapshot into their brain during their creative process is something you don’t get to experience every day. The interviews with these artists made me feel more confident in my work, and made me realize not everything I create has to be show-quality. And if it’s not, it’s okay to cut it up, paint over it, and use it with a completely different medium than it was originally intended. I know I’ll be going back to this book time and time again for years to come when I need to get unstuck or want to try something new.

I recommend this book to anyone who has even an inkling of artist within you. Students, beginning artists, advanced artists, Picassos, and those who just want to dabble in art for fun occasionally would all benefit from Creative Block. A huge thanks to Danielle for creating a go-to guide and reference for artists everywhere!

Book Review: Creative Block

Book Review: Creative Block

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